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Relationships of lifestyle factors with serum DHEAS and IGF-1 concentration in prepubertal children.

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Dr Swati Bhave    16 November 2017

The purpose of a new study published in Clinical Endocrinology was to investigate the associations of lifestyle factors such as dietary factors physical activity and sedentary behavior with serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate DHEAS and insulin like growth factor 1 IGF 1 in children. This cross sectional analysis enrolled a cohort of 431 prepubertal children aged from 6 to 9 years. These subjects were assessed by a combined heart rate and movement monitor as well as a questionnaire. The results revealed that consumption of low fiber grain products and intake of vegetable protein were positively associated whereas consumption of sugar sweetened beverages was inversely associated with DHEAS after adjustment for sex age and body fat percentage. While energy intake was positively associated with IGF 1 adjusting for sex age and body fat percentage. On the other hand vigorous physical activity was inversely associated with DHEAS after adjustment for sex and age and total moderate vigorous and moderate to vigorous physical activity were inversely associated whereas total sedentary behavior was positively associated with IGF 1 adjusting for sex and age. Meanwhile none of physical activity measures was associated with DHEAS or IGF 1 after additional adjustment for body fat percentage. Hence it was inferred that lifestyle factors have weak and moderate associations with biochemical markers of adrenarche in prepubertal children. It was stated that these associations suggest body fat independent and dependent influences of diet and physical activity respectively.

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