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Biomechanical stability of sacroiliac screw osteosynthesis with and without cement augmentation. |
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Biomechanical stability of sacroiliac screw osteosynthesis with and without cement augmentation.
eMediNexus,  14 February 2020
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Percutaneous sacroiliac (SI) screw fixation is the standard operative treatment of traumatic disruptions to the posterior pelvic ring.

The aim of a new study published in Injury was to determine whether cement augmentation of a single SI screw would provide biomechanical stability comparable to that of the double-screw technique.

In this study, three sacroiliac screw osteosynthesis configurations were tested on 10 human cadaveric pelvis specimens – a single cannulated screw; two cannulated screws; and a single, cement-augmented cannulated screw. Displacement and stiffness of the anterior and posterior pelvic ring, after fixation with each technique, were measured under axial load.

The findings revealed that a single uncemented screw offered significantly worse stability in the anterior pelvis compared to a double-screw technique and to a single cement-augmented screw technique. There was no significant difference in anterior pelvic ring stability between the single cement-augmented screw technique and the double-screw technique. Additionally, there was no significant difference in the stability of the posterior pelvic ring between the three techniques.

From the results, it was inferred that a single cement-augmented cannulated sacroiliac screw provides biomechanical stability similar to that of a non-augmented double-screw technique in the treatment of posterior pelvic ring fractures.

Source: Injury. 2020 Jan 30. pii: S0020-1383(20)30071-1. doi: 10.1016/j.injury.2020.01.043.

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